Latest board member Emmanuel Marsh shares how MATV/UMA can sparkle more brightly

The latest addition to the MATV/UMA Board Emmanuel Marsh shares why he thinks MATV/UMA is “a gem in the city” and how he would like to help it sparkle more brightly.

Ari Taylor, Board President, invited Emmanuel Marsh, J.D. to join the MATV/UMA board of directors. Emmanuel said, “if Ari recommends this and wants me to participate, I am in.” Though Marsh came in second in the members vote for Board of Directors after Karen Lynch, an appointed seat opened, which allowed Marsh to step in. It is clear why Ari thought Emmanuel would be perfect for MATV/UMA. Marsh has a drive to nourish community that began early.


“Ever since I was in elementary school, I wanted to become a news anchor/field reporter. I carried that dream through college where upon graduation I received my degree in Broadcast Journalism from Suffolk University. The ability to bring readers from different backgrounds together was one of the reasons I went into the field of Journalism. The other reason was to learn and experience different cultures.”

Though his professional means to fulfilling the drive shifted from broadcast journalism, to politics and most recently law – Emmanuel’s essential interest in empowering people through education and giving people a voice is a constant. Emmanual Marsh has a Masters in Political Science and Government and a Juris Doctor (J.D.). Emmanuel plans to apply his education and experience to help to advance and/or advocate for working people and their families.

MATV/UMA is vital for a diverse city like Malden

Emmanuel believes, “MATV/UMA keeps the community involved and informed. Citizens learn about the activities that are happening in the city such as the School Committee and City Council meetings. It is a way for the Citizens of Malden to learn the changes that are transpiring throughout the community and to voice their concerns.”

In particular, offerings like Neighborhood View (Community journalism) “come in handy” to offer bits about local flavor, happenings, issues, and people. During a time when local newspapers are disappearing, some way to capture news and culture is needed, like fun tips on the local cuisine or new restaurants. This community journalism platform, helps “keep journalism relevant.”

“Public access television is important to a community such as Malden.” It is all about supporting the democratic ideals where every voice counts. This effort is worth carrying forward and building on. And, the practice of inviting all kinds of people to create content to share with the community can go beyond cable without disturbing the essential spirit.

“I have a lot of ideas for MATV/UMA”

When Emmanuel reads a Neighborhood view article or attends an event hosted by MATV/UMA, he thinks “there are still 60,000 people in Malden who don’t know each other. Most don’t know MATV/UMA exists.” They might not know they can get Mexican food just down the street from their apartment or house. They may not be aware of local issues or how to voice their concerns. Emmanuel wants to help reach more of those folks who could really benefit by being tied into the community through MATV/UMA. He also sees a need to reach beyond cable – tapping into the market of YouTube tv, Netflix, and Amazon Prime users. Lucky for us, Emmanuel says, “I have lots of ideas.”

Highlight virtual presence

Emmanuel would love to help us harness Instagram, snapchat, TikTok or any other social media platforms that are useful and relevant to those we want to reach. With these platforms we can work harder to draw folks to virtual events whether live or recorded.

UMA to go

Since Emmanuel likes to be on the move, he understands those who use cell phones for everything and don’t use a desktop computer. “Making everything easily accessible on a phone is important,” he says. “Maybe build an app, like NPR’s phone app – everything there and organized, available when taking a walk, or on the move.”

Expand the funding source

In a statement to the membership, Emmanuel writes that “public access television is under attack. Public access television receives its funding through the cable providers that service Malden. The new trend is for individuals to cancel their cable subscriptions due to the high cost of services. I believe we should explore different alternative methods to support the Malden Television Station.” He goes on to say that he wants to “work with city leaders and state legislatures to help find alternative methods to keep funding for this cherished community resource [MATV/UMA].”

Excited for the possibilities

Emmanuel is enthusiastic about being part of efforts that “capture the essential things that transpire; keep the relevant issues on the radar; keep people informed; and connect people with each other.” This, after all, is right up his alley: to give people a voice and opportunities to learn and grow.

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